High Dollar College Scholarships for High School Senior 2019-2020

via US News and World Report

1. GE-Reagan Foundation Scholarship Program: The GE-Reagan Foundation Scholarship Program celebrates students “who demonstrate exemplary leadership, drive, integrity, and citizenship,” according to the program’s website. You must have a minimum 3.0 GPA, be a U.S. citizen and be a high school senior planning to enroll full time in college in the upcoming year. Obviously higher GPAs and all of the above qualities will be attractive to the scholarship readers and staff.

Besides writing an application essay, you’ll need a strong recommendation from a community leader, such as your principal or an elected official. Each year, around 20 students are selected; winners are typically notified in February, and they receive an award of up to $10,000. The award is renewable for up to an additional three years, so each recipient could receive up to $40,000 total. The scholarship doesn’t mention need but to be on the safe side students should always fill out their 2019 FAFSA before applying for any scholarship.

2. Gates Scholarship: The Gates Scholarship offers a full ride to 300 deserving students every year. To be eligible, you must be a minority student with financial need – eligible for Pell Grants – and have a record of academic excellence. The Gates Scholarship is closed for this year but should reopen during July 2019 for rising seniors in 2019-2020.

In particular, the Gates Scholarship committee looks for high school seniors in the top 10 percent of their class who show leadership and unique personal strengths. You must also be a U.S. citizen, national or permanent resident.

If you win this selective scholarship, you’ll get funding for the full cost of attendance of your school minus your expected family contribution as determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and other aid you’ve received.

BASIC ELIGIBILITY FOR THE GATES SCHOLARSHIP

via The Gates Scholarship

To apply, students must be:

  • A high school senior
  • From at least one of the following ethnicities: African-American, American Indian/Alaska Native*, Asian & Pacific Islander American, and/or Hispanic American
  • Pell-eligible
  • A US citizen, national, or permanent resident
  • In good academic standing with a minimum cumulative weighted GPA of 3.3 on a 4.0 scale (or equivalent) 

 Additionally, a student must plan to enroll full-time, in a four-year degree program, at a US accredited, not-for-profit, private or public college or university.


IDEAL CANDIDATE

An ideal candidate will have:

  • An outstanding academic record in high school (in the top 10% of his/her graduating class)
  • Demonstrated leadership ability (e.g., as shown through participation in community service, extracurricular, or other activities)
  • Exceptional personal success skills (e.g., emotional maturity, motivation, perseverance, etc.)


Expanding Your Intelligence

When you learn new connections are made from your brain cells. Never stop learning.

The Five Paragraph Essay

After spending the past five years reading scholarship essays I’m convinced that students either forget or were never taught how to write an essay. I even made a fill-in-the-banks worksheet to help students stick to the five paragraph format. I had very little success with college students. If you are suddenly faced with the task of writing such an essay you can fill in the areas below and be on your way to a successful essay:

Introductory sentence and a broad statement of your essay topic. Add a transition to point #1.

Point #1 with example and end with transition to point #2.

Point #2 with an example and ending with a transition to point #3

Point #3 with . an example and ending with a transition to conclusion paragraph.

Conclusion where you tie up all the loose ends and summarize your points and examples.

I hope this might stir up some creative juices or at least give a framework for your ideas. As always be sure to send us your examples if you’d like some help.

What’s Your Learning Style?

Often a conflict occurs between the student’s teacher and their own learning style. Knowing your own learning style can help you plan how to be most effective while studying. Richard Felder and Barbara Soloman from North Carolina State University created the Learning Styles Index in order for students to see their own learning style. The questionnaire is free to fill out and see the results. The link to the questionnaire is here.

What Matters Most in College Admissions?

(via Prep Scholar)

A great college application will have most or all of the following elements:

  • A high GPA (relative to what admitted students have) and a rigorous curriculum (Points for as many AP or AICE courses as possible).
  • Strong test scores (relative to what admitted students have)
  • A specific, honest, and well-written personal statement that talks about why you have chosen their university.
  • A unique extracurricular interest or passion (a “spike,” as we like to call it). Extra points for significant awards like the Pathfinder awards in your interest field.
  • Volunteering experience with measurable impact. Extra points for self-starting a volunteer project or charity and participating all 4 years of high school.
  • Compelling letters of recommendation written on your behalf.
  • Work experience, particularly jobs related to your academic or professional interests including internships or fieldwork.

It’s OK if you don’t have every single quality listed above, but if you do, being accepted to the college of your choice will go way up!

Wondering about approved calculators for the ACT Math and SAT?

Here’s a link to the approved list of calculators for the SAT and ACT Math tests. You can also call 800.498.6481  for a recorded message about the ACT calculator policy.

Basically no keyboards unless A-Z in layout. No styluses. No power cords so make sure you charge the battery. They suggest graphing and not scientific calculators. Texas Instruments and Casio have the most models listed.

ACT and SAT Test Dates Through July 2019

ACT TEST DATES

February 9, 2019

April 13, 2019

June 8 2019

July 13, 2019

SAT TEST DATES

March 19, 2019

May 4, 2019

June 4, 2019

Register for the ACT

Register for the SAT

New York becomes the first state to offer free college tuition to residents.

Retrieved from NY Post

New York’s Governor Cuomo’s Excelsior Scholarship provides free in-state tuition for students from families with adjusted gross incomes of $125,000 or less. It is the first program of its kind in the country to fully subsidize tuition at both four-year and community colleges.

Students must maintain a minimum grade-point average to qualify.

Cuomo is expected to tout the program at a bill-signing ceremony Wednesday at La Guardia Community College in Queens.

Lawmakers also approved a new tuition assistance program for students at private colleges that offers up to $3,000 in tuition grants. That assistance, too, comes with a requirement that a student remain in New York after graduation.

Students who receive free tuition and then leave the state for an advanced degree won’t have to pay the money back, assuming they return to New York once they complete their graduate studies. State officials also plan to make accommodations for graduates who leave the state for military service.

Under a provision that was added to the tuition bill at the last moment, students who get a free ride at CUNY and SUNY schools must live and work in New York state for up to four years after graduation, or be forced to pay the money back.

“The concept of investing in you and your education is that you’re going to stay here and be an asset to the state. If you don’t want to stay here, then go to California now, let them pay for your college education.”

But one professor of higher education slammed the proposal as “economically and educationally foolish.”

“As someone who has worked on almost every free college bill, I promise@NYGovCuomo won’t be remembered well if he keeps this provision,” Temple University Professor Sara Goldrick-Rab tweeted.

 

Idaho gives students money for AP and other early college experiences.

Retrieved from The Hechinger Report.

Every seventh grader gets $4,125 to spend on early college credits, other extras.

At the beginning of this school year, the state put $4,125 in an online account  every  Idaho seventh- through 12th-grader to spend on any academic boost they think they need to be better prepared for college.

The new money for students comes as part of a 20-point state plan to improve K-12 education, spearheaded by Idaho’s state legislature.

One goal of the program is to encourage more high school students to earn college credits and take AP courses and exams, which can often be cashed in for college credits.  As part of the push to get more kids to attend college, the state hopes to even the playing field for students from lower-income families and to ensure no student is discouraged from taking on advanced coursework because of the cost. Taking college courses in high school could also lower long-term costs for students, advocates of the practice say.

Despite relatively little hard data on how much it helps students, the push to have more students graduate with a few college courses and credits already under their belts has been gaining steam for a decade now in at least a dozen states. More than 1.4 million students took such courses during the 2010-2011 school year, the last period for which federal figures are available.

That number has likely grown since then as more students, not just the highest achievers, have begun to sign up for these courses, said Adam Lowe, executive director of the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, which pushes for and accredits such programs.

“They are no longer the Doogie Howser programs,” Lowe said, in a reference to the fictional teenage genius played by a young Neil Patrick Harris in the 1990s TV series of the same name. “Those exist, but in many states now they’re seeing students who are college bound, and saying, ‘Let’s give them a chance to take college early.’”

The Coalition Application Platform is Live Now!

students-want

via The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Coalition for Access, Affordability, and Success has delivered a new college-application platform. As of Monday, a handful of participating colleges are now accepting applications through the online portal, which supporters hope will redefine the admissions process. A total of 56 institutions plan to start using the coalition’s application over the next few weeks.

The Common Ap now has competition in The Coalition Ap.  High school seniors check them both out and make your decisions on where to apply.  If you need help email me here.

Skip to toolbar