Archives for : Colleges

Check out video tours of colleges!

Definitely take a look at youniversitytv.com to check out college tours of schools that you may be interested in.  Here’s a way to check out some schools in advance of visiting them.

 

Top 10 Minority Scholarships for College in 2015

via  http://redcarpetshelley.com/home/top-10-black-and-minority-scholarships-for-2015-apply-now-deadlines-approaching/

Here’s the information about 10 great minority scholarships for 2015.  Now go apply!

#1 – Tom Joyner Foundation “Full Ride” Scholarship: Awards a full scholarship to one student to attend a Historically Black College and University (HBCU). The scholarship is open to graduating high school seniors with high academic records. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

#2 – The Gates Millennium Scholars Program (The Bill Gates Scholarship): Awards scholarships each year to African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian Pacific Islander American or Hispanic American students who plan to enroll full-time in a two-year or four-year college or university program. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

#3 – Burger King Scholars Program: Designed to help high-school seniors who are looking to start college next year. Annually, the program awards more than $1.4 million in scholarships to more than 1,000 students. Applicants must be residents of the United States or Canada, and must be graduating high school seniors. The deadline to apply is in December 2014.

#4 – Go Red Multicultural Scholarship Fund For Women: Aims to ease the financial burden to students and increase the number of underrepresented minorities in medicine. Also, champions greater inclusion of multicultural women in the nursing and medical industries. The deadline to apply is in December 2014.

#5 – Foot Locker Scholar Athletes Program: Gives high school students who are active it sports and in their communities, as well as outstanding students, an opportunity to win a $20,000 college scholarship. Students must be planning to attend a four-year college. The deadline to apply is in December 2014.

#6 – Ron Brown Scholar Program: Provides scholarship awards to African-American high school seniors who are excelling in their academics, exhibiting exceptional leadership potential, and actively serving in community service activities. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

#7 – Dell Scholars Program: Recognizes students who have overcome significant obstacles to pursue their educations, and are now serving as positive role models in their communities. Awards hundreds of scholarships each year annually, and since 2004, has given away more than $31 million in college funding. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

#8 – Generation Google Scholarship For Minorities, Women and Disabled Students: Helps minority students who plan to attend college and study computer science and technology. Eligible students must be African American, Hispanic, American Indian, female, or one who has a disability. Deadline is in January 2015.

#9 – United Negro College Fund (UNCF) Scholarships: Provides extraordinary amounts of scholarship opportunities for minority students with financial need. Scholarships include educational assistance for students attending participating Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU) and other colleges as well. The deadlines to apply varies.

#10 – Ronald McDonald House Charities Scholarships For Minority Students: Gives financial aid awards to Black, Hispanic and Asian eligible high school students with high academic performance and community service as well as financial need. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

These scholarships are available here.

When Should you take the ACT?

students-want

What should I do?

My advice to students applying to competitive colleges is to take the ACT once in the spring of junior year and once in the fall of senior year.

However, the best time to take the ACT depends on a variety of factors: the schools to which you’re applying, your application deadlines, your cash flow and your personality.  Your score does not always improve by taking the test multiple times.

The ACT is offered six times in a year: September, October, December, February, April and May.

If you’re a senior applying early action or early decision, you’ll want the September exam. Scores from exams later in the fall may not reach colleges in time.

If you’re a junior you have several options. One is  to wait until senior year — there’s no requirement to take the exam junior year, and taking the exam more than once doesn’t always have a measurable benefit. If you’re applying to one of the country’s top universities or top colleges, it probably is a good idea to take the exam in the spring of junior year. Doing so allows you to get your scores, compare them to the score ranges in the college profiles, and see if taking the exam again in senior year makes sense. By testing junior year, you have the opportunity to use the summer to take practice exams, work with me through ACT preparation or take an ACT prep course either in person or online.

As a sophomore it is not necessary to take the ACT but you may want to work through a practice test just to see how you would do.  Remember to take sufficient math courses in order to answer the trigonometry questions in the math section.  Many students do not take trig but wish they would have later on.

retrieved from colleges.about.org

ACT Test Dates

Test Date                                Reg. Registration                                                 Late Registration

12/13/2014 11/7/2014 11/21/2014
2/7/2015 1/9/2015 1/16/2015
4/18/2015 3/13/2015 3/27/2015
6/13/2015 5/8/2015 5/22/2015

SAT Dates Coming Up in Late 2014 and 2015

Test Date Tests Offered Regular Registration Closes Late Registration Closes
Dec. 6, 2014 SAT & Subject Tests Nov. 6 Nov. 24
Jan. 24, 2015 SAT & Subject Tests Dec. 29 Jan. 13
March 14, 2015 SAT only Feb. 13 March 3
May 2, 2015 SAT & Subject Tests April 6 April 21
June 6, 2015 SAT & Subject Tests May 8 May 27

College Application Boot Camp

Pick-a-College

 

I will be offering a college application boot camp during the winter break.  The location will be West Boynton Beach.

The boot camp will cover essay writing, resume writing and application strategies.   All students will receive follow-up materials to help them throughout their search.

Contact me for more information nancy at decision learn.com.

 

 

What can an College Consultant do for You?

via Higher Educaton Consultants

students-want

How Can An Educational Consultant Help Your Family?

A professional educational consultant works one-on-one with each student, helping to identify colleges and universities that offer the best matches for the student’s unique needs, and keeping the student on track through every phase of the college application process.

A consultant can help your family with:
High School curriculum planning. A consultant can help students make smart choices about their high school courses so that they stay on track for college admissions.
College admissions profile assessment. Although no consultant can guarantee admission to any individual college, a consultant can help your child identify their strengths as an applicant.
College selection. A consultant can assist your child in finding the colleges and universities which best match their interests, personality, needs and admissions profile.
College entrance exams. A professional consultant can answer questions about which college entrance exams are most appropriate for your child and when to schedule testing. Some consultants also provide assistance with test preparation.
College applications and essays. A consultant works with each student to establish a realistic schedule for staying on top of application details and deadlines. Consultants may also review application elements, including essays.
Majors and Careers. Students often benefit from guidance in choosing majors and careers that are a good fit, as well as information about which colleges offer strong programs in areas of interest.
Financial Aid. Many families worry about how to pay for college expenses. A consultant can help your family navigate these concerns, while pointing your family in the direction of financial aid and merit scholarship opportunities.
Help from a non-biased third party so that you and your child can focus on enjoying this time together, rather than arguing about completing college applications

College Counseling Including Unlimited Essay Writing Critique

High School Juniors, Seniors and Parents,

I will walk you carefully through the entire college admissions process including essays, acceptances and scholarships!  I will only take a limited number of students so you receive personalized attention.  Don’t become a number in a class.  Stand up and stand OUT!

I can be reached by email through this site.  Assistance is available in person (South Florida),  by Skype or Ichat.

Make this school year GREAT!

 

Nancy

10 Important Facts about the New SAT!

via Education Dive

SAT

 

 

1. No more cramming?

One of the main ideas behind the redesign is to place more value on accumulated classroom study than last-minute cramming for the specific test. College Board President David Coleman says this is to emphasize “that the road to success is not last-minute tricks or cramming but the learning students do over years each day.”

2. Take that, test preppers

With the redesign, the College Board is hoping to make things more difficult for the for-profit test-preparation industry. New test-prep tutorials will be offered online for free. The College Board seems to be sensitive to criticisms that it unfairly favors rich families that can pay for expensive test prep courses and materials. In announcing the SAT changes, College Board President David Coleman said that the organization “cannot stand by while some test-prep providers intimidate parents at all levels of income into the belief that the only way they can secure their child’s success is to pay for costly test preparation and coaching.”

3. Source material will be pertinent

Students will have to analyze and use evidence from reading passages and informational graphics, edit certain texts, and write their analysis of source texts. The current test, for example, didn’t require students to cite evidence in the reading and writing sections. Source material will be pertinent to topics covered in history, social studies, and science classes.

4. Goodbye flash cards — eventually

The test will focus on relevant words — words that students use or will use in their everyday lives — instead of obscure words. The test will ask students to figure out the meaning of the words based on their context in reading passages.

In describing the change, the College Board references the ultimate pointlessness of studying for obscure-word vocabulary tests: “No longer will students use flashcards to memorize obscure words, only to forget them the minute they put their test pencils down.” But because the changes don’t go into effect for another two years, students will be using the flash card technique for another couple of years.

5. Math now focuses on “the heart of algebra”

For the new math section, more questions will be asked — 57, in 80 minutes — and calculators will be forbidden on one part of it. Also, more of the questions will be based on “the heart of algebra,” with a focus on linear equations and functions.

6. The good old 1600

The SAT’s maximum score will return to 1600 from 2400, and multiple-choice questions will have four possible answers instead of five. An additional score will be given for the essay section, which will be optional.

7. Guessing is encouraged

The new test also drops penalties for incorrect answers. Instead, test scores will be based only on the number of correct answers, which means test takers should guess even when they have no clue about the correct answer. According to FiveThirtyEight.com, “guessing isn’t just advisable, it’s about to become strategically crucial for people seeking to maximize their performance.”

8. College application fee waivers for some

For each student who takes the SAT and meets certain income eligibility requirements, the College Board will provide four college application-fee waivers so students can apply to schools for free.

9. Critics aren’t satisfied

Even with the changes, critics say the SAT and other standardized tests are a poor predictor of college success. Colleges that require students to supply test scores to be considered for admission are needlessly eliminating qualified applicants, claim critics. Instead, according to a study released in February, high school GPA is a far more accurate predictor of success in college.

10. Is the SAT a dying breed anyway?

The so-called test-optional movement is gaining momentum. About 800 colleges and universities now admit a substantial number of students without SAT or ACT scores to undergrad programs, according to the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. The SAT launched in 1926, while its rival, the ACT, started in 1959. By 2012, the ACT had overtaken the SAT, as measured by the number of test takers.

 

Social Media and College Acceptance

via Education Dive

Attention all graduating seniors and parents:  Check out The New York Times: They Loved Your G.P.A. Then They Saw Your Tweets.

  • While less than a third of admissions officers say they check students’ social media, the practice is growing and many colleges do not have firm policies on it.
  • Admissions officials shared anecdotes about sometimes rejecting an applicant because of material found online.
  • A lawyer specializing in social media law says looking at posts online is dangerous because colleges might wrongly identify the account of a person with the same name as a prospective student.

 

Students have little to gain from having their postings publicly available. It’s hard to find a story of an admissions officer stumbling across something positive and throwing open the gates of the university to a student. The advice for sharing judiciously on social media goes for college faculty, too.  The first amendment rights can be liberally construed or not!