Archives for : educational issues

New York becomes the first state to offer free college tuition to residents.

Retrieved from NY Post

New York’s Governor Cuomo’s Excelsior Scholarship provides free in-state tuition for students from families with adjusted gross incomes of $125,000 or less. It is the first program of its kind in the country to fully subsidize tuition at both four-year and community colleges.

Students must maintain a minimum grade-point average to qualify.

Cuomo is expected to tout the program at a bill-signing ceremony Wednesday at La Guardia Community College in Queens.

Lawmakers also approved a new tuition assistance program for students at private colleges that offers up to $3,000 in tuition grants. That assistance, too, comes with a requirement that a student remain in New York after graduation.

Students who receive free tuition and then leave the state for an advanced degree won’t have to pay the money back, assuming they return to New York once they complete their graduate studies. State officials also plan to make accommodations for graduates who leave the state for military service.

Under a provision that was added to the tuition bill at the last moment, students who get a free ride at CUNY and SUNY schools must live and work in New York state for up to four years after graduation, or be forced to pay the money back.

“The concept of investing in you and your education is that you’re going to stay here and be an asset to the state. If you don’t want to stay here, then go to California now, let them pay for your college education.”

But one professor of higher education slammed the proposal as “economically and educationally foolish.”

“As someone who has worked on almost every free college bill, I promise@NYGovCuomo won’t be remembered well if he keeps this provision,” Temple University Professor Sara Goldrick-Rab tweeted.

 

The Coalition Application Platform is Live Now!

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via The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Coalition for Access, Affordability, and Success has delivered a new college-application platform. As of Monday, a handful of participating colleges are now accepting applications through the online portal, which supporters hope will redefine the admissions process. A total of 56 institutions plan to start using the coalition’s application over the next few weeks.

The Common Ap now has competition in The Coalition Ap.  High school seniors check them both out and make your decisions on where to apply.  If you need help email me here.

ACT English-What’s on the test?

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Grammar and punctuation have been the bane in many student’s existence when studying for the ACT and SAT.  Whether this material was ever taught or never reviewed it is material that must be mastered before taking any standardized test at the high school level or above.

The ACT Usage and Mechanics include: Punctuation as in commas, colons, semicolons, apostrophes,exclamation marks, periods and quotation marks.  Know that a semicolon has two complete clauses on either side but a colon only has one complete clause and a list of 3 or more items on the right hand side.

Grammar and Usage:  subject-verb agreement, pronoun forms and agreement, modifier and verb forms, parallelism. comparisons and idioms and possession. Make sure the pronouns agree with the antecedent and don’t be fooled by the clutter in the sentence.  Make sure the nouns, verbs, and prepositions are in the same form.

Sentence Structure:  Fragment and whole sentences, modifier placement and verb tense and voice.

Sounds impossible right?  No it’ s not.  I have a great series of worksheets that go through each grammar point and explain it along with two pages of related problems.  After you’ve completed those the answer is imprinted into your brain-seriously-I-swear.  Know a dash from a hyphen?  Hope so.

 

5 Ways Your C+ student Can Successfully Get Into College.

SAT

My university announced that they will require a 3.6 Grade point average from incoming freshman students in 2016. Immediately I thought of my son who left high school with 2.6 GPA. In the senior magazine he was listed as “undecided” as to his college of choice. At the time I said “what are you undecided about?” His 2.6 left him one choice-the local community college which he tackled and graduated and then did well at the four year university and graduated. After graduation he took the LSAT, was admitted to law school and passed the bar the first time. He’s now a lawyer working in construction law and earning a nice salary.

What does my story tell you? That some students are late bloomers…..late to the college admissions business. Not mature, not interested or just not in a hurry. It can be done though as my son proved to me. At each challenge his sisters said he would not be do it. He just kept on facing challenges and moving forward.

Here’s the 5 ways…and I hope they are helpful.

1. If your high school student has mediocre grades and shows no signs of improving them the community college for a two year period is a great option. Many parents send their children to a state or community college that is located near the four year university of their choice. It’s motivating, maybe. We found that our son still needed some encouragement to get the work done so he lived at home those two years.

2. Foster any area in which your student has success.
If he’s an athlete, artist, musician, entrepreneur or you can foster an interest in them in community service. There’s no talent required but effort is paramount. Your child can build a great portfolio of community service projects that may encourage interest from colleges. These projects can become family projects passed from one child to the next. One family started a school supplies drive and continued it after the kids graduated.

3. Consider smaller private universities if you can afford the tuition. After the recent recession smaller schools are hurting for students. They may have an interest in your reluctant student.

4. Can you encourage your student to consider leadership classes or programs? One is Boys/Girls State programs sponsored by the American Legion chapters in your area. It’s an essay contest but some chapters have problems findings students to send. It is in the summer of junior year of high school and is free to participants. One counselor told me that students who participate in this program are prized by colleges. They also earn college credit for their week long stay.

5. Major universities are starting hybrid online/in person programs for students that do not meet their in person standards. The University of Florida has the Pathways to Campus program and complete online degree programs. It might be appropriate for your student to start in a program like this and transfer later.

Hope this helps your student find their success in higher education!

Nancy

Scholarship Comparison worksheet

ScholarshipComparisonTool

Here’s a great worksheet for those of you lucky enough to get multiple scholarship offers from different schools.

Let us know how you make out!

What About that Free Community College Tuition Plan?

retrieved from Education Dive
President Barack Obama’s free community college plan would help students who have the greatest difficulty repaying their student loans, despite the already-low price of a two-year degree, Fortune.com reports.
The student loan default rate for community college students is more than twice that of four-year college students, even though their average annual tuition is $3,347, compared to more than $9,000 for public four-year schools, in state, and more than $31,000 for private schools.
For community college students who take out student loans, the average debt load is $10,000.

Also check out the Fortune article here

Top 10 Minority Scholarships for College in 2015

via  http://redcarpetshelley.com/home/top-10-black-and-minority-scholarships-for-2015-apply-now-deadlines-approaching/

Here’s the information about 10 great minority scholarships for 2015.  Now go apply!

#1 – Tom Joyner Foundation “Full Ride” Scholarship: Awards a full scholarship to one student to attend a Historically Black College and University (HBCU). The scholarship is open to graduating high school seniors with high academic records. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

#2 – The Gates Millennium Scholars Program (The Bill Gates Scholarship): Awards scholarships each year to African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian Pacific Islander American or Hispanic American students who plan to enroll full-time in a two-year or four-year college or university program. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

#3 – Burger King Scholars Program: Designed to help high-school seniors who are looking to start college next year. Annually, the program awards more than $1.4 million in scholarships to more than 1,000 students. Applicants must be residents of the United States or Canada, and must be graduating high school seniors. The deadline to apply is in December 2014.

#4 – Go Red Multicultural Scholarship Fund For Women: Aims to ease the financial burden to students and increase the number of underrepresented minorities in medicine. Also, champions greater inclusion of multicultural women in the nursing and medical industries. The deadline to apply is in December 2014.

#5 – Foot Locker Scholar Athletes Program: Gives high school students who are active it sports and in their communities, as well as outstanding students, an opportunity to win a $20,000 college scholarship. Students must be planning to attend a four-year college. The deadline to apply is in December 2014.

#6 – Ron Brown Scholar Program: Provides scholarship awards to African-American high school seniors who are excelling in their academics, exhibiting exceptional leadership potential, and actively serving in community service activities. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

#7 – Dell Scholars Program: Recognizes students who have overcome significant obstacles to pursue their educations, and are now serving as positive role models in their communities. Awards hundreds of scholarships each year annually, and since 2004, has given away more than $31 million in college funding. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

#8 – Generation Google Scholarship For Minorities, Women and Disabled Students: Helps minority students who plan to attend college and study computer science and technology. Eligible students must be African American, Hispanic, American Indian, female, or one who has a disability. Deadline is in January 2015.

#9 – United Negro College Fund (UNCF) Scholarships: Provides extraordinary amounts of scholarship opportunities for minority students with financial need. Scholarships include educational assistance for students attending participating Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU) and other colleges as well. The deadlines to apply varies.

#10 – Ronald McDonald House Charities Scholarships For Minority Students: Gives financial aid awards to Black, Hispanic and Asian eligible high school students with high academic performance and community service as well as financial need. The deadline to apply is in January 2015.

These scholarships are available here.

What can an College Consultant do for You?

via Higher Educaton Consultants

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How Can An Educational Consultant Help Your Family?

A professional educational consultant works one-on-one with each student, helping to identify colleges and universities that offer the best matches for the student’s unique needs, and keeping the student on track through every phase of the college application process.

A consultant can help your family with:
High School curriculum planning. A consultant can help students make smart choices about their high school courses so that they stay on track for college admissions.
College admissions profile assessment. Although no consultant can guarantee admission to any individual college, a consultant can help your child identify their strengths as an applicant.
College selection. A consultant can assist your child in finding the colleges and universities which best match their interests, personality, needs and admissions profile.
College entrance exams. A professional consultant can answer questions about which college entrance exams are most appropriate for your child and when to schedule testing. Some consultants also provide assistance with test preparation.
College applications and essays. A consultant works with each student to establish a realistic schedule for staying on top of application details and deadlines. Consultants may also review application elements, including essays.
Majors and Careers. Students often benefit from guidance in choosing majors and careers that are a good fit, as well as information about which colleges offer strong programs in areas of interest.
Financial Aid. Many families worry about how to pay for college expenses. A consultant can help your family navigate these concerns, while pointing your family in the direction of financial aid and merit scholarship opportunities.
Help from a non-biased third party so that you and your child can focus on enjoying this time together, rather than arguing about completing college applications

College Counseling Including Unlimited Essay Writing Critique

High School Juniors, Seniors and Parents,

I will walk you carefully through the entire college admissions process including essays, acceptances and scholarships!  I will only take a limited number of students so you receive personalized attention.  Don’t become a number in a class.  Stand up and stand OUT!

I can be reached by email through this site.  Assistance is available in person (South Florida),  by Skype or Ichat.

Make this school year GREAT!

 

Nancy

10 Important Facts about the New SAT!

via Education Dive

SAT

 

 

1. No more cramming?

One of the main ideas behind the redesign is to place more value on accumulated classroom study than last-minute cramming for the specific test. College Board President David Coleman says this is to emphasize “that the road to success is not last-minute tricks or cramming but the learning students do over years each day.”

2. Take that, test preppers

With the redesign, the College Board is hoping to make things more difficult for the for-profit test-preparation industry. New test-prep tutorials will be offered online for free. The College Board seems to be sensitive to criticisms that it unfairly favors rich families that can pay for expensive test prep courses and materials. In announcing the SAT changes, College Board President David Coleman said that the organization “cannot stand by while some test-prep providers intimidate parents at all levels of income into the belief that the only way they can secure their child’s success is to pay for costly test preparation and coaching.”

3. Source material will be pertinent

Students will have to analyze and use evidence from reading passages and informational graphics, edit certain texts, and write their analysis of source texts. The current test, for example, didn’t require students to cite evidence in the reading and writing sections. Source material will be pertinent to topics covered in history, social studies, and science classes.

4. Goodbye flash cards — eventually

The test will focus on relevant words — words that students use or will use in their everyday lives — instead of obscure words. The test will ask students to figure out the meaning of the words based on their context in reading passages.

In describing the change, the College Board references the ultimate pointlessness of studying for obscure-word vocabulary tests: “No longer will students use flashcards to memorize obscure words, only to forget them the minute they put their test pencils down.” But because the changes don’t go into effect for another two years, students will be using the flash card technique for another couple of years.

5. Math now focuses on “the heart of algebra”

For the new math section, more questions will be asked — 57, in 80 minutes — and calculators will be forbidden on one part of it. Also, more of the questions will be based on “the heart of algebra,” with a focus on linear equations and functions.

6. The good old 1600

The SAT’s maximum score will return to 1600 from 2400, and multiple-choice questions will have four possible answers instead of five. An additional score will be given for the essay section, which will be optional.

7. Guessing is encouraged

The new test also drops penalties for incorrect answers. Instead, test scores will be based only on the number of correct answers, which means test takers should guess even when they have no clue about the correct answer. According to FiveThirtyEight.com, “guessing isn’t just advisable, it’s about to become strategically crucial for people seeking to maximize their performance.”

8. College application fee waivers for some

For each student who takes the SAT and meets certain income eligibility requirements, the College Board will provide four college application-fee waivers so students can apply to schools for free.

9. Critics aren’t satisfied

Even with the changes, critics say the SAT and other standardized tests are a poor predictor of college success. Colleges that require students to supply test scores to be considered for admission are needlessly eliminating qualified applicants, claim critics. Instead, according to a study released in February, high school GPA is a far more accurate predictor of success in college.

10. Is the SAT a dying breed anyway?

The so-called test-optional movement is gaining momentum. About 800 colleges and universities now admit a substantial number of students without SAT or ACT scores to undergrad programs, according to the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. The SAT launched in 1926, while its rival, the ACT, started in 1959. By 2012, the ACT had overtaken the SAT, as measured by the number of test takers.