Archives for : decision learn

The Coalition Application Platform is Live Now!

students-want

via The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Coalition for Access, Affordability, and Success has delivered a new college-application platform. As of Monday, a handful of participating colleges are now accepting applications through the online portal, which supporters hope will redefine the admissions process. A total of 56 institutions plan to start using the coalition’s application over the next few weeks.

The Common Ap now has competition in The Coalition Ap.  High school seniors check them both out and make your decisions on where to apply.  If you need help email me here.

How to Apply for College for Free

students-want

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/paying-for-college/articles/2012/09/13/how-to-apply-to-college-for-free-2

Via usnews.com

How can I reduce the cost of applying to college?

1. If you apply online you can score free application submissions at many colleges. In addition to Washington and Jefferson College, the numerous institutions that waive application fees for online applicants include Upper Iowa University, Millikin University, Juniata College, Kettering University, York College of Pennsylvania, Drake University, Smith College, Barry University, and Mercyhurst College.

Often, schools advertise the fact that they waive application fees for online applicants. As you’re exploring the websites of colleges you’re considering, keep your eyes peeled for a money-saving application option.

2.  If you’ve made an on-campus visit be sure to ask if you can have a fee-waiver for the application fee.  Many schools will be glad to issue you a waiver if you have visited the campus.

3. At Western New England University in Massachusetts, for instance, students can apply for free if they have a parent or grandparent who attended or if they’re are able to secure a letter of recommendation from another grad.  Be sure to ask if you have an alumni connection as well.

4.Many schools have indicated that they will waive the application fee for students who demonstrate financial need, including Dartmouth College, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Colorado—Boulder. Ask and all they can say is NO.  With proof of financial need, students may be able to secure fee waivers from the National Association of College Admission Counseling, and students who have received an SAT/ACT fee waiver can apply for free passes from the College Board. Students can also go to guidance counselors at their high schools for help; at schools such as Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa, a fee waiver signed by a counselor grants a free application.

5.  Reach out to college admissions officers at your first choice school and indicate it is your first choice and here is my GPA and test scores.  Ask for their opinion before you spend the money and apply.  Chances are if you reach a real person they will be honest with you and save you the cost of applying if you aren’t in their target for scores.

 

Thanks to US New and World Report for their valuable tips.

 

5 Ways Your C+ student Can Successfully Get Into College.

SAT

My university announced that they will require a 3.6 Grade point average from incoming freshman students in 2016. Immediately I thought of my son who left high school with 2.6 GPA. In the senior magazine he was listed as “undecided” as to his college of choice. At the time I said “what are you undecided about?” His 2.6 left him one choice-the local community college which he tackled and graduated and then did well at the four year university and graduated. After graduation he took the LSAT, was admitted to law school and passed the bar the first time. He’s now a lawyer working in construction law and earning a nice salary.

What does my story tell you? That some students are late bloomers…..late to the college admissions business. Not mature, not interested or just not in a hurry. It can be done though as my son proved to me. At each challenge his sisters said he would not be do it. He just kept on facing challenges and moving forward.

Here’s the 5 ways…and I hope they are helpful.

1. If your high school student has mediocre grades and shows no signs of improving them the community college for a two year period is a great option. Many parents send their children to a state or community college that is located near the four year university of their choice. It’s motivating, maybe. We found that our son still needed some encouragement to get the work done so he lived at home those two years.

2. Foster any area in which your student has success.
If he’s an athlete, artist, musician, entrepreneur or you can foster an interest in them in community service. There’s no talent required but effort is paramount. Your child can build a great portfolio of community service projects that may encourage interest from colleges. These projects can become family projects passed from one child to the next. One family started a school supplies drive and continued it after the kids graduated.

3. Consider smaller private universities if you can afford the tuition. After the recent recession smaller schools are hurting for students. They may have an interest in your reluctant student.

4. Can you encourage your student to consider leadership classes or programs? One is Boys/Girls State programs sponsored by the American Legion chapters in your area. It’s an essay contest but some chapters have problems findings students to send. It is in the summer of junior year of high school and is free to participants. One counselor told me that students who participate in this program are prized by colleges. They also earn college credit for their week long stay.

5. Major universities are starting hybrid online/in person programs for students that do not meet their in person standards. The University of Florida has the Pathways to Campus program and complete online degree programs. It might be appropriate for your student to start in a program like this and transfer later.

Hope this helps your student find their success in higher education!

Nancy

American Parents lag behind their Global Peers too!

Via Education Week Teacher

students-want

On Tuesday, results of a study called the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies were released by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), bringing to light not altogether surprising information: American adults–not just kids–lag behind their global peers in math, reading, and problem-skills. The study findings “reinforced just how large the gap is between the nation’s high- and low-skilled workers and how hard it is to move ahead when your parents haven’t.” Adults with college-educated parents were far more likely to have gone to college themselves, and to have higher skills and better wages as a result. Unfortunately, these results belie the prevalence of the iconic first-generation college student, who defeats all odds and lifts him or herself to a better station than that of the previous generation.

Americans Strongly Support Experiential Learning

from a Northeastern University study released 10-8-2013

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Amer­i­cans strongly sup­port expe­ri­en­tial learning in which a student’s class­room edu­ca­tion is inte­grated with pro­fes­sional work expe­ri­ence. Nearly nine in 10 Amer­i­cans (89 per­cent) believe that stu­dents with work expe­ri­ence related to their field of study are more suc­cessful employees—and nearly three in four hiring decision-​​makers (74 per­cent) agree. Among those that gained work expe­ri­ence during col­lege, a large majority (82 per­cent) says it was valu­able for their per­sonal and pro­fes­sional development.